Can police question you without a lawyer Why or why not?

Yes. You have the constitutional right to talk to a lawyer before answering questions, whether or not the police tell you about that right. The lawyer’s job is to protect your rights. … If you do not have a lawyer, you may still tell the officer you want to speak to one before answering questions.

Can police interrogate you without lawyer?

Police are required to stop their interrogation at the time you ask for an attorney, and cannot question you further until you have an attorney present. You must clearly communicate that you are asking for an attorney and that you do not wish to be questioned anymore.

What do you do if police ask you questions?

You should treat a telephone call from a police officer like any other police questioning, and, as a general rule, politely decline to speak to the officer and immediately schedule an appointment with a local defense attorney.

Can you refuse to go in for questioning?

You Can Always Say ‘No’ to Police Questioning

Even if you’re not the subject of a criminal investigation, you always have the right to decline to answer police questions. This applies whether an officer approaches you on the street, calls you to come into the station for questioning, or even after you’re arrested.

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Can I refuse to give a statement to the police?

Without a statement, an officer will arrest you because they do not know both sides of the story. Officers get angry if you do not give a statement and are more likely to arrest you. If they haven’t arrested you, you might be able to talk your way out of it.

What are my rights when police question me?

You have the constitutional right to remain silent. In general, you do not have to talk to law enforcement officers (or anyone else), even if you do not feel free to walk away from the officer, you are arrested, or you are in jail. You cannot be punished for refusing to answer a question.

How do you tell if the police are investigating you?

Signs of Being Under Investigation

  1. The police call you or come to your home. …
  2. The police contact your relatives, friends, romantic partners, or co-workers. …
  3. You notice police vehicles or unmarked cars near your home or business. …
  4. You receive friend or connection requests on social media.

Can the police hold you for questioning?

If you have been arrested on suspicion of an offence, the police are allowed to detain you for a reasonable time to carry out investigations, for example, to interview you, if you agree to being interviewed. This period cannot normally be more than six hours (unless an extension is granted by a detention warrant).

How do I decline a police interview?

Repeat the statement until the officers stop questioning you.

  1. “I refuse to answer any questions until my attorney is present.”
  2. “I do not want to talk to you, I want to talk to my attorney.”
  3. “I’m invoking my Miranda rights.”
  4. “I will not speak to you until I call my attorney.”
  5. “I am claiming the right to remain silent.”
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What evidence do the police need to charge you?

The evidence they gather includes documentary, physical, photographic and other forensic evidence and not just witness testimony. The police arrest and interview suspects. All of this produces a file which when complete the police send to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) for review and a decision on prosecuting.

Can police force you to make a statement?

Whilst there is no legal requirement to give a witness statement to the police there is a moral duty on each of us to help the police with their enquiries. For many, the prospect of giving a statement and appearing in court is frightening for reasons such as fear of reprisals and nervousness about going to court.

Can a victim change their statement?

First, it is possible for the victim to recant their testimony. This is done when they want to change what they told police officers or want to withdraw the statement completely. … Third, the victim recanting a statement or refusing to testify can lead to legal trouble for them in some cases.