Best answer: What did Attorney General do?

Attorneys general are the top legal officers of their state or territory. They advise and represent their legislature and state agencies and act as the “People’s Lawyer” for the citizens. Most are elected, though a few are appointed by the governor.

What was the role of the Attorney General?

The principal duties of the Attorney General are to: Represent the United States in legal matters. … Furnish advice and opinions, formal and informal, on legal matters to the President and the Cabinet and to the heads of the executive departments and agencies of the government, as provided by law.

What did Washington’s Attorney General do?

Bob Ferguson is Washington’s 18th attorney general. As the state’s chief legal officer, he directs 500 attorneys and 600 professional staff providing legal services to state agencies, Governor and Legislature. … Keeping communities safer by supporting law enforcement; Protecting our environment; and.

Why is the Attorney General so important?

As the chief law enforcement officer of the federal government, the Attorney General serves many vital roles. … Gives legal advice to the President and the Cabinet. Appears before the Supreme Court in important legal matters involving the nation or federal government.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Frequent question: What courts can an advocate appear in?

What does the US attorney general investigate?

AGs investigate and bring actions under their states’ respective unfair, deceptive, and abusive practices laws (“UDAP laws”). UDAP laws tend to broadly prohibit “deceptive” or “unconscionable” acts against consumers.

What does an attorney do?

An attorney’s main role is to advise and represent clients and their legal rights in civil and criminal cases. Their services can vary from giving professional advice to preparing documents and appearing in court to plead on behalf of the client.

Who was the last Attorney General?

California Former Attorneys General

Kamala D. Harris 2010 – 2017
Earl Warren 1939 – 1943
Ulysses S. Webb 1902 – 1939
Tiery L. Ford 1899 – 1902
William F. Fitzgerald 1895 – 1899

Who was the youngest Attorney General?

Richard Rush , the youngest Attorney General, was born on August 29, 1780, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Who was the first secretary of war?

When Washington was inaugurated as the first President under the Constitution, he appointed Knox to continue serving as Secretary of War.

Secretary of War (1789–1947)

No. 1
Secretary of War Henry Knox
Took office September 12, 1789
Left office December 31, 1794
President serving under George Washington

Why was attorney general created?

The Judiciary Act of 1789 created the Office of the Attorney General (AG) to represent the federal government in cases before the US Supreme Court and to give legal advice to the President or the heads of cabinet-level departments.

When was attorney general created?

The office of attorney general of the United States was created by the Judiciary Act of 1789 that divided the country into districts and set up courts in each one, along with attorneys with the responsibility for civil and criminal actions in their districts.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Why do lawyers get so much money?

How much does a DA make?

The salaries of District Attorneys in the US range from $13,279 to $356,999 , with a median salary of $64,623 . The middle 57% of District Attorneys makes between $64,627 and $162,013, with the top 86% making $356,999.

Whats Does FBI mean?

The FBI stands for Federal Bureau of Investigation. “Federal” refers to the national government of the United States. “Bureau” is another word for department or division of government. “Investigation” is what we do—gathering facts and evidence to solve and prevent crimes.

Is the AG a prosecutor?

A lawyer who represents the state in local criminal cases is usually referred to as the “District Attorney,” although, depending on your state, these attorneys can go by other titles such as “Prosecuting Attorney” or “County Attorney.” The Attorney General of a state typically represents the state in civil cases, but …